IN CELIA'S WORDS

One of the consequences of our national sporting obsession is our blindness to its faults. The world of sports, despite sometimes being descried as an international language, is a closed world with a closed culture. It is characterised by many assumptions about safety and by deeply-held beliefs about purity, truth and virtue. It is also a world in which the 'other' is readily ignored, whether this be women, racial minorities, disabled athletes or paedophiles. In the cosy world of sports, where physical perfection and spiritual cleanliness are aspired to and expected, it is thought impossible for sexual violations to occur from within.

— from the presentation Sex offending in sports: a whole new ball game?

This short film introduces the work of the CPSU team and how it supports sports organisations to safeguard children and young people attending and participating in sport.

 
 
 
Myths about abuse in sport
Keynote address to the conference ‘How Safe is Your Sport’ held at the Excel Sports Centre, Coventry in 2010, hosted by the Coventry Sports Foundation and the NSPCC Child Protection in Sport Unit.
 
Sex offending in sports: a whole new ball game?
Presentation to the Association for the Treatment of Sexual Abusers in 2003
 
 
 
 
 

AN APPRECIATION BY...

Sue Ravenlaw, Head of Equality and Safeguarding at the Football Association

Professor Celia Brackenridge is one of a kind. Celia’s commitment to and diligence in her work over the decades, challenging sex discrimination, sexual harassment and child abuse in sport, has been both visionary and outstanding.

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AN APPRECIATION BY...

Anne Tiivas, Director of the Child Protection in Sport Unit

I have never known anybody who is as committed to ensuring the safety of young athletes in sport. Celia’s contribution to athlete wellbeing, both for young athletes and for older athletes, has been immeasurable.

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